Switching to DHCP

What is DHCP, and why should I switch?

See this announcement.

How do I switch to DHCP?

Before switching to DHCP, please go to https://netreg.whoi.edu/bin/prereg.pl to confirm that your machine has been accurately registered. Also verify that DHCP is available in your location.

Instructions are available for the following operating systems:

If you need any assistance, contact the CIS Help Desk at x2439.

Instructions by Operating System

Windows 2000

  1. From the Start menu, select Settings and then Control Panel.
  2. Double-click the Network and Dial-up Connections icon.
  3. Right-click on the Local Area Connection icon and select Properties.
  4. Select (highlight) Internet Protocols (TCP/IP) and click the Properties button.
  5. Check the radio buttons for Obtain an IP address automatically and Obtain DNS server address automatically.
  6. Click the OK button and close the window.
  7. You may need to reboot your computer.

[Windows 2000 screen shot]

Windows XP Professional

  1. From the Start menu, select Settings and then Network Connections, or select Control Panel and then double-click on the Network Connections icon.
  2. Right-click on the Local Area Connection icon and select Properties.
  3. In the General tab, select (highlight) Internet Protocols (TCP/IP) and click the Properties button.
  4. Check the radio buttons for Obtain an IP address automatically and Obtain DNS server address automatically.
  5. Click the OK button and close the window.
  6. You may need to reboot your computer.

[Windows XP screen shot]

Mac OS X Tiger (10.4) and Panther (10.3)

  1. Open System Preferences from the Dock or the Apple menu.
  2. Select Network preferences.
  3. From the Location: pull-down menu, select New Location....
  4. Enter a name for your location.
  5. From the Show: pull-down menu, select Built-in Ethernet.
  6. Select Using DHCP from the Configure IPv4: pull-down menu. Leave all of the text areas blank.
  7. Click the Apply Now button and close the window.

[Mac OS X screen shot]

Red Hat Linux and Fedora Core

  1. Open the GUI network administration/configuration tool (if you can't find it under the menus, type redhat-config-network (Red Hat 9 and Enterprise 3.0) or system-config-network (Fedora) at a shell prompt).
  2. Make sure your network interface (typically eth0) is highlighted and click the Edit icon.
  3. Select the Automatically obtain IP address settings with dhcp radio button.
  4. Check the Automatically obtain DNS information from provider checkbox.
  5. Select Save from the File menu and close the window.

Alternately,

  1. Run ifconfig to identify your network interface (typically eth0).
  2. Bring down the network interface with ifdown eth0.
  3. Edit the file /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth0 so that it contains only the following lines for eth0:
    DEVICE=eth0
    BOOTPROTO=dhcp
    ONBOOT=yes
    
  4. Bring the network interface back up with ifup eth0.
  5. Check the nameservers listed in /etc/resolv.conf. They should be 128.128.243.2 and 128.128.243.3.

Debian GNU/Linux and derivatives

There are a variety of GUI tools (e.g., network-admin in GNOME) which can be used to configure your network settings. Alternately,

  1. Run ifconfig to identify your network interface (typically eth0).
  2. Bring down the network interface with ifdown eth0.
  3. Edit /etc/network/interfaces so that the only lines for eth0 are:
    auto eth0
    iface eth0 inet dhcp
    
  4. Bring the network interface back up with ifup eth0.
  5. Check the nameservers listed in /etc/resolv.conf. They should be 128.128.243.2 and 128.128.243.3.